Slide background

Five Towns College Employment Statistics

The data and information provided on this page for Five Towns College degree programs was obtained the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics unless otherwise noted. Learn more information about degree-specific Five Towns College employment estimates, mean wage estimates, projections, and more.

Select a Program

Audio Recording Technology Concentration

The Five Towns College employment statistics and information provided on this page for the degree programs in Business Management, or Music Business come from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Listed below are the Standard Occupational Codes (S.O.C.) for the paid positions for which a B.P.S. Business Management: Audio Recording Technology, or a Mus.B. Jazz/Commercial Music: Audio Recording Technology degree might be appropriate qualifications. On this page are also provided employment estimates and mean wage estimates for broadcast and sound engineering technicians and radio operators. In addition, there are links to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics website for all of the Five Towns College employment statistics that follow:

This broad occupation includes the following detailed occupations:

27-4011 Audio and Video Equipment Technicians

Set up, or set up and operate audio and video equipment including microphones, sound speakers, video screens, projectors, video monitors, recording equipment, connecting wires and cables, sound and mixing boards, and related electronic equipment for concerts, sports events, meetings and conventions, presentations, and news conferences. May also set up and operate associated spotlights and other custom lighting systems. Excludes “Sound Engineering Technicians” (27-4014).

27-4012 Broadcast Technicians

Set up, operate, and maintain the electronic equipment used to transmit radio and television programs. Control audio equipment to regulate volume level and quality of sound during radio and television broadcasts. Operate radio transmitter to broadcast radio and television programs.

27-4013 Radio Operators

Receive and transmit communications using radiotelegraph or radiotelephone equipment in accordance with government regulations. May repair equipment.

27-4014 Sound Engineering Technicians

Operate machines and equipment to record, synchronize, mix, or reproduce music, voices, or sound effects in sporting arenas, theater productions, recording studios, or movie and video productions.

27-4099 Media and Communication Equipment Workers, All Others

Broadcast and sound engineering technicians and radio operators held about 114,600 jobs in 2008. Their employment was distributed among the following detailed occupations:

  • Audio and video equipment technicians: 55,400
  • Broadcast technicians: 38,800
  • Sound engineering technicians: 19,500
  • Radio operators: 1,000
Earnings

Television stations usually pay higher salaries than radio stations, commercial broadcasting usually pays more than non-commercial broadcasting, and stations in large markets pay more than those in small markets.

Median annual wages of audio and video equipment technicians in May 2008 were $38,050. The middle 50 percent earned between $28,130 and $51,780. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $21,500, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $66,030. Median annual wages in motion picture and video industries, which employed the largest number of audio and video equipment technicians, were $39,410.

Median annual wages of broadcast technicians in May 2008 were $32,900. The middle 50 percent earned between $22,900 and $49,340. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $17,510, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $66,550. Median annual wages in radio and television broadcasting, which employed the largest number of broadcast technicians, were $29,220.

Median annual wages of sound engineering technicians in May 2008 were $47,490. The middle 50 percent earned between $32,770 and $69,700. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $23,790, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $92,700.

Median annual wages of radio operators in May 2008 were $37,120. The middle 50 percent earned between $27,890 and $48,200. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $19,240, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $61,290.

For the latest wage information, visit the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) website.

Business Administration/Business Management

The data and information provided on this page for the degree programs in Business Management come from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

11-1021 General and Operations Managers:

Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of public or private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services. Excludes First-Line Supervisors.

11-2011 Advertising and Promotions Managers:

Plan, direct, or coordinate advertising policies and programs or produce collateral materials, such as posters, contests, coupons, or give-aways, to create extra interest in the purchase of a product or service for a department, an entire organization, or on an account basis.

11-2022 Sales Managers:

Plan, direct, or coordinate the actual distribution or movement of a product or service to the customer. Coordinate sales distribution by establishing sales territories, quotas, and goals and establish training programs for sales representatives. Analyze sales statistics gathered by staff to determine sales potential and inventory requirements and monitor the preferences of customers.

11-3011 Administrative Services Managers:

Plan, direct, or coordinate one or more administrative services of an organization, such as records and information management, mail distribution, facilities planning and maintenance, custodial operations, and other office support services. Medical records administrators are included in “Medical and Health Services Managers” (11-9111). Excludes “Purchasing Managers” (11-3061).

11-3131 Training and Development Managers:

Plan, direct, or coordinate the training and development activities and staff of an organization.

13-1011 Agents and Business Managers of Artists, Performers, and Athletes:

Represent and promote artists, performers, and athletes to prospective employers. May handle contract negotiation and other business matters for clients.

51-1011 First-Line Supervisors of Production and Operating Workers:

Directly supervise and coordinate the activities of production and operating workers, such as inspectors, precision workers, machine setters and operators, assemblers, fabricators, and plant and system operators. Excludes team or work leaders.

For the latest wage information, visit the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) website.

Education

The data and information provided on this page for the degree programs in Education come from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Listed below are the Standard Occupational Codes (S.O.C.) for the paid positions for which a B.S. Childhood Education degree or an M.S. Education degree might be appropriate qualifications. On this page are also provided employment estimates and mean wage estimates for preschool and kindergarten teachers, preschool teachers, kindergarten teachers, and elementary school teachers. In addition, there are links to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics website for all of the information that follows:

This broad occupation includes the following detailed occupations:

25-2011 Preschool Teachers, Except Special Education

Instruct preschool-aged children in activities designed to promote social, physical, and intellectual growth needed for primary school in preschool, day care center, or other child development facility. Substitute teachers are included in “Teachers and Instructors, All Other” (25-3099). May be required to hold State certification. Excludes “Childcare Workers” (39-9011) and “Special Education Teachers” (25-2050).

25-2012 Kindergarten Teachers, Except Special Education

Teach elemental natural and social science, personal hygiene, music, art, and literature to kindergarten students. Promote physical, mental, and social development. May be required to hold State certification. Substitute teachers are included in “Teachers and Instructors, All Other” (25-3099). Excludes “Special Education Teachers” (25-2050).

25-2021 Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education

Teach students basic academic, social, and other formative skills in public or private schools at the elementary level. Substitute teachers are included in “Teachers and Instructors, All Other” (25-3099). Excludes “Special Education Teachers” (25-2050).

25-2022 Middle School Teachers, Except Special and Career/Technical Education

Teach students in one or more subjects in public or private schools at the middle, intermediate, or junior high level, which falls between elementary and senior high school as defined by applicable laws and regulations. Substitute teachers are included in “Teachers and Instructors, All Other” (25-3099). Excludes “Career/Technical Education Teachers, Middle School ” (25-2023) and “Special Education Teachers” (25-2050).

25-2023 Career/Technical Education Teachers, Middle School

Teach occupational, career and technical, or vocational subjects in public or private schools at the middle, intermediate, or junior high level, which falls between elementary and senior high school as defined by applicable laws and regulations. Substitute teachers are included in “Teachers and Instructors, All Other” (25-3099). Excludes “Special Education Teachers” (25-2050).

25-1191 Graduate Teaching Assistants

Assist department chairperson, faculty members, or other professional staff members in college or university by performing teaching or teaching-related duties, such as teaching lower level courses, developing teaching materials, preparing and giving examinations, and grading examinations or papers. Graduate assistants must be enrolled in a graduate school program. Graduate assistants who primarily perform non-teaching duties, such as laboratory research, should be reported in the occupational category related to the work performed.

25-1194 Vocational Education Teachers, Postsecondary

Teach or instruct vocational or occupational subjects at the postsecondary level (but at less than the baccalaureate) to students who have graduated or left high school. Include correspondence school instructors; industrial, commercial and government training instructors; and adult education teachers and instructors who prepare persons to operate industrial machinery and equipment and transportation and communications equipment. Teaching may take place in public or private schools whose primary business is education or in a school associated with an organization whose primary business is other than education.

25-3999 Teachers and Instructors, All Others

This OES occupation is a combination of data collected for the 2010 SOC occupations 25-2059 Special Education Teachers, All Other, 25-3099 Teachers and Instructors, All Other and the 2000 SOC occupation 25-3099 Teachers and Instructors, All Other.

25-9031 Instructional Coordinators

Develop instructional material, coordinate educational content, and incorporate current technology in specialized fields that provide guidelines to educators and instructors for developing curricula and conducting courses. Includes educational consultants and specialists, and instructional material directors.

25-9041 Teacher Assistants

Perform duties that are instructional in nature or deliver direct services to students or parents. Serve in a position for which a teacher has ultimate responsibility for the design and implementation of educational programs and services. Excludes “Graduate Teaching Assistants” (25-1191).

For the latest wage information, visit the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) website.

Film/Video

The film career statistics provided on this page for the degree programs in Film/Video come from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Listed below are the Standard Occupational Codes (S.O.C.) for the paid positions for which a Bachelor of Fine Arts for Film/Video (B.F. A.) degree might be an appropriate qualifications. On this page are also provided employment estimates and mean wage estimates for Television, video, and motion picture camera operators. In addition, there are links to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics website for all of the film career statistics that follow:

This broad occupation includes the following detailed occupations:

27-4031 Camera Operators, Television, Video, and Motion Picture

Operate television, video, or motion picture camera to photograph images or scenes for various purposes, such as TV broadcasts, advertising, video production, or motion pictures.

27-4032 Film and Video Editors

Edit motion picture soundtracks, film, and video. May edit or synchronize soundtracks with images. Excludes “Sound Engineering Technicians”(27-4014).

27-4099 Media and Communication Equipment Workers, All Other

All media and communication equipment workers not listed separately.

27-1027 Set and Exhibit Designers

Design special exhibits and movie, television, and theater sets. May study scripts, confer with directors, and conduct research to determine appropriate architectural styles.

For the latest wage information, visit the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) website.

Mass Communication

The Five Towns College employment statistics provided on this page for the degree program in Mass Communication come from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Listed below are the Standard Occupational Codes (S.O.C.) for the paid positions for which a Bachelor of Science for Mass Communication — B.S. degree might be appropriate qualifications. On this page is also provided employment estimates and mean wage estimates for broadcasters and journalists.

This broad occupation includes the following detailed occupations:

27-4031 Camera Operators, Television, Video, and Motion Picture

Teach courses in communications, such as organizational communications, public relations, radio/television broadcasting, and journalism. Include both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of both teaching and research.

27-3011 Radio and Television Announcers

Speak or read from scripted materials, such as news reports or commercial messages, on radio or television. May announce artist or title of performance, identify station, or interview guests. Excludes “Broadcast News Analysts” (27-3021).

27-3012 Public Address System and other Announcers

Make announcements over public address system at sporting or other public events. May act as master of ceremonies or disc jockey at weddings, parties, clubs, or other gathering places.

27-3021 Broadcast News Analysts

Analyze, interpret, and broadcast news received from various sources.

27-3022 Reporters and Correspondents

Collect and analyze facts about newsworthy events by interview, investigation, or observation. Report and write stories for newspaper, news magazine, radio, or television. Exclude “Broadcast News Analysts” (27-3021).

27-3031 Public Relations Specialists

Engage in promoting or creating an intended public image for individuals, groups, or organizations. May write or select material for release to various communications media.

27-3091 Interpreters and Translators
27-3099 Media and Communication Workers, All Other
27-3043 Writers and Authors

Originate and prepare written material, such as scripts, stories, advertisements, and other material. Excludes “Public Relations Specialists” (27-3031) and “Technical Writers” (27-3042).

27-4099 Media and Communication Equipment Workers, All Other

All media and communication equipment workers not listed separately.

For the latest wage information, visit the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) website.

Music

The music career statistics provided on this page for the degree programs in Music Business, Business Management come from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Listed below are the Standard Occupational Codes (S.O.C.) for the paid positions for which an A.A.S. Business Management, Music Business Specialist, A.A.S. Jazz/Commercial Music, B.P.S. Business Management (Music Business), M.M. Jazz/Commercial Music, or D.M.A. Composition/Arranging degree might be appropriate qualifications. On this page you can also find music career statistics that include employment estimates and mean wage estimates for musicians, singers and related workers. In addition, there are links to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics website for all of the information that follows:

This broad occupation includes the following detailed occupations:

27-2041 Music Directors and Composers

Conduct, direct, plan, and lead instrumental or vocal performances by musical groups, such as orchestras, choirs, and glee clubs. Include arrangers, composers, choral directors, and orchestrators.

27-2042 Musicians and Singers

Play one or more musical instruments or entertain by singing songs in recital, in accompaniment, or as a member of an orchestra, band, or other musical group. Musical performers may entertain on-stage, radio, TV, film, video, or record in studios. Exclude “Dancers” (27-2031).

27-2099 Entertainers and Performers, Sports and Related Workers, All Other

All media and communication equipment workers not listed separately.

25-1121 Art, Drama, and Music Teachers, Postsecondary

Teach courses in drama, music, and the arts including fine and applied art, such as painting and sculpture, or design and crafts. Includes both teachers primarily engaged in teaching and those who do a combination of teaching and research.

Earnings

Median hourly wages of wage-and-salary musicians and singers were $21.24 in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $11.49 and $36.36. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $7.64, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $59.92. Median hourly wages were $23.68 in performing arts companies and $12.50 in religious organizations. Annual wage data for musicians and singers were not available because of the wide variation in the number of hours worked by musicians and singers and the short-term nature of many jobs. It is rare for musicians and singers to have guaranteed employment that exceeds 3 to 6 months.

Median annual wages of salaried music directors and composers were $41,270 in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $26,480 and $63,200. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $16,750, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $107,280.

For self-employed musicians and singers, earnings typically reflect the number of jobs a freelance musician or singer played or the number of hours and weeks of contract work, in addition to a performer’s professional reputation and setting. Performers who can fill large concert halls, arenas, or outdoor stadiums generally command higher pay than those who perform in local clubs. Soloists or headliners usually receive higher earnings than band members or opening acts. The most successful musicians earn performance or recording fees that far exceed the median earnings.

The American Federation of Musicians negotiates minimum contracts for major orchestras during the performing season. Each orchestra works out a separate contract with its local union, but individual musicians may negotiate higher salaries. In regional orchestras, minimum salaries often are less because fewer performances are scheduled. Regional orchestra musicians frequently are paid for their services without any guarantee of future employment. Community orchestras often have limited funding and offer salaries that are much lower for seasons of shorter duration.

Although musicians employed by some symphony orchestras work under master wage agreements, which guarantee a season’s work up to 52 weeks, many other musicians face relatively long periods of unemployment between jobs. Even when employed, many musicians and singers work part time in unrelated occupations. Thus, their earnings for music usually are lower than earnings in many other occupations. Moreover, because they may not work steadily for one employer, some performers cannot qualify for unemployment compensation and few have typical benefits such as sick leave or paid vacations. For these reasons, many musicians give private lessons or take jobs unrelated to music to supplement their earnings as performers.

Many musicians belong to a local of the American Federation of Musicians. Professional singers who perform live often belong to a branch of the American Guild of Musical Artists; those who record for the broadcast industries may belong to the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists.

For the latest wage information, visit the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) website.

Theatre

The Five Towns College employment statistics provided on this page for the degree program in Theatre Arts come from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Listed below are the Standard Occupational Codes (S.O.C.) for the paid positions for which a Bachelor of Fine Arts for Theatre Arts (B.F.A.) degree might be appropriate qualifications. On this page is also provided employment estimates and mean wage estimates for actors, producers, and directors. In addition, there are links to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics website for all of the information that follows:

This broad occupation includes the following detailed occupations:

27-2011 Actors

Play parts in stage, television, radio, video, or motion picture productions for entertainment, information, or instruction. Interpret serious or comic roles by speech, gesture, and body movement to entertain or inform audiences. May dance and sing. Sample of reported job titles: Actor, Actress, Comedian, Comic, Community Theater Actor, Narrator, Voice-Over Artist, Stand Up Comedian, Theatre Ensemble Member, Understudy.

27-2012 Producers and Directors

Produce or direct stage, television, radio, video, or motion picture productions for entertainment, information, or instruction. Responsible for creative decisions, such as interpretation of script, choice of actors or guests, set design, sound, special effects, and choreography.

27-2031 Dancers

Perform dances. May perform on stage, for on-air broadcasting, or for video recording. Illustrative examples: Tap Dancer, Dance Artist, Ballerina.

27-2032 Choreographers

Create new dance routines. Rehearse performance of routines. May direct and stage presentations. Illustrative examples: Dance Director, Dance Master.

27-1027 Set and Exhibit Designers

Design special exhibits and movie, television, and theater sets. May study scripts, confer with directors, and conduct research to determine appropriate architectural styles.

27-2099 Entertainers and Performers, Sports and Related Workers, All Other

Design special exhibits and movie, television, and theater sets. May study scripts, confer with directors, and conduct research to determine appropriate architectural styles.

For the latest wage information, visit the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) website.