Slide background

Five Towns College’s Student Learning Assessment System

Overview of the Educational Evaluation

The College’s Student Learning Assessment System (S.L.A.S.) consists of two major components: (a) one for General Education and (b) another for each Degree Program registered with the New York State Department of Education.

General Education consists of a set of courses that address the essential skills, knowledge, abilities, values and attitudes the faculty and administration deem necessary for any graduate of Five Towns to demonstrate in order to function effectively as an educated citizen in a democratic society. Among these essential General Education skills, knowledge, abilities, values and attitudes are the ability to think critically, to write well, to speak well, to value art and music, to understand cultural diversity, to know how to locate and evaluate the quality of information, to use computers, and to have some understanding of the Scientific Method and quantitative reasoning.

The faculty in each Degree Program offered at Five Towns have also established a set of essential skills, knowledge, abilities, values and attitudes for each of their programs. For example, the B.F.A. in Film/Video requires students wishing to graduate to demonstrate skills and knowledge in Film History, Cinematography, Film Editing, Film Directing, Film Producing, and Script Writing. In order to be awarded a B.F.A. in Film/Video, a student must take the required courses in the Film/Video Division that not only provide instruction in these important areas but also provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate their ability to meet the graduation standards in each required area.

Assessment of Student Learning

Principles Underlying the College’s Student Learning Assessment System

Five Towns College has formulated its SLAS based upon a number of principles. These principles were designed to assist in both the development and the implementation of the SLAS. They were also intended to make clear the values and guidelines underlying the SLAS. It should be noted that the process of designing and implementing the SLAS began in 2005 and is a dynamic process, not a static one. The SLAS undergoes regular reviews and modifications so that student learning at Five Towns can be constantly improved.

Scope of Student Assessment

  1. The College’s Student Learning Assessment System must emphasize the key values, skills, knowledge, abilities, and dispositions essential for not only the General Education Program but for each Program of Study.
  2. Every student must be informed of the courses, the instruments, and the data for which her/his progress on satisfying a Graduation Standard for Proficiency will be assessed.
  3. Every student enrolled at Five Towns College merits regular feedback on his/her progress in satisfying the Graduation Standards for each Proficiency in the General Education Program and in her/his Program of Study.
  4. Any student achieving an “Unacceptable” score on an Artifact should be permitted the opportunity to redo, resubmit, and/or retake a submitted Artifact at least once within the time constraints established by the instructor.
  5. No student will be permitted to pass a course requiring an Artifact without receiving at least an “Acceptable” rating on the Artifact.

Administration

  1. The primary role of administrators is to: (a) facilitate for students and faculty knowledge of the College’s SLAS, (b) ensure the collection, storage, analysis, and reporting of SLAS data, and (c) oversee the process of making changes based upon SLAS data.
  2. Assessment specialists will provide ongoing individualized and group instruction to faculty and students.
  3. Administrators will ensure that “a culture of assessment” is maintained at the College.

Faculty

  1. The Division faculty are responsible for the development and refinement of the Proficiencies, Graduation Standards, Courses, and Artifacts for their particular degree programs.
  2. The Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment Committee is responsible for the overseeing the General Education Program Committee, which is responsible for reviewing and recommending changes in the General Education Program.
  3. Changes in the SLAS are the responsibility of Division faculty and the Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment Committee.
  4. Any instructor teaching a course for which an Artifact is required must ensure that the required Artifact is corrected and submitted to the Administration in a timely manner.

Student Learning Assessment

  1. Student assessment is “data-driven” and “performance-based.”
  2. Assessment data must appropriately document that a student has attained the College’s Graduation Standard for Proficiency.
  3. Assessment data may range from video clips, audio files, rating sheets, and portfolios to PowerPoint presentations, photographs, worksheets, manuscripts, final examinations, etc. Data do not need to be paper-and-pencil-based, e.g., corrected tests, quizzes, and examinations.
  4. Assessment data ought to be as basic as necessary in order to demonstrate the attainment of a minimum Graduation Standard.
  5. Assessment data will be collected during each semester and reported at least annually.
  6. Assessment data will, at a minimum, satisfy the test of “face validity.”
  7. Assessment data ought to promote interrater reliability.
  8. Assessment data should be collected, corrected, stored, and reported as electronically as is feasible.
  9. Assessment data should promote the documentation of growth in student learning.
  10. Standardized tests should be utilized as Artifacts when College-developed Artifacts are unavailable, unreliable, time-consuming to administer, and/or expensive alternatives.

Back to Top

Assessment Glossary

A Dictionary of Student Learning Assessment Terms

Artifact: The type of data or information collected, stored and evaluated by faculty for a course in order to demonstrate that a student has fulfilled the Graduation Standard for a Proficiency. Artifacts may consist of research papers, projects, film clips, recorded speeches, recitals, final examinations, scripts, compositions and other types of material.

Example: For the General Education Proficiency, “Oral Communication,” Speech #2 is recorded and evaluated in the course SPE 101, Fundamentals of Speech and Speech #6 in SPE 231, Public Speaking


Course: The specific course title and course ID number required for successful completion of a Proficiency in order to demonstrate that an Artifact has met the Graduation Standard.

Example: SPE 101, Fundamentals of Speech; MUS 511, Jazz Harmony 1


Graduation Standard: The requirements specified in order to fulfill a designated Proficiency. The Graduation Standard is written as the minimum level of performance necessary to satisfy the designated Proficiency.

Example: For “Oral Communication” the Graduation Standard is: “Prepare and deliver a well-organized, content-rich and articulate public presentation of several minutes duration”. 


Portal: A designated timeframe for a review of a student’s progress towards her/his intended degree. There are typically four portals in a degree program:

  • *Portal #1: Upon admission and enrollment at the College to ensure that the student has the requisite capabilities to complete a degree program successfully.
  • *Portal #2: Upon completion of one year of full-time enrollment at the College or of approximately 27 credit hours to ensure that the student is making satisfactory progress in a degree program.
  • *Portal #3: Upon completion of three years of full-time enrollment at the College or of approximately 87 credit hours to ensure, once again, that a student is making satisfactory progress in a degree program.
  • *Portal #4: Upon filing the Application for Graduation to ensure that the graduating student has or will have fulfilled all the Graduation Standards for all the required General Education and Degree Proficiencies.

Portfolio Template: The PASS-PORT listing of the Mission and Goals of a Degree Program. Also included in the Portfolio Template are all the required Proficiencies, Graduation Standards, Courses and Artifacts for the Degree Program. All matriculating undergraduate students receive the General Education Portfolio Template in addition to their applicable Degree Program Portfolio Template and Concentration Portfolio Template. Graduate student receive only the Degree Program Portfolio Template and, when appropriate, the Concentration Portfolio Template.

Examples:

MUS.B. JAZZ/COMMERCIAL MUSIC 2016-2017

A. MISSION

Through a common core of technical studies and a foundation for courses in a major area of concentration, the Mus.B. Program in Jazz/Commercial Music develops in students the knowledge, skills and dispositions required of professional musicians, including an integral approach to the study of harmony, melody, rhythm, counterpoint, instrumentation, texture and composition, and the development of proficiencies in writing skills, aural skills, music analysis and reading facility.

B. LEARNING GOALS & PERFORMANCE STANDARDS:

Graduates of the Mus.B. Program in Jazz/Commercial Music must demonstrate mastery in each of the seven Proficiencies listed below:


EAR TRAINING 2016-17

The Graduation Standard:

Demonstrate advanced ear training through Level Four of the Five Towns College Ear Training Core as set forth in the Five Towns College Undergraduate Catalog, including training in the aural recognition and notation of diatonic intervals, simple and compound rhythms and harmonic materials, melodic phrases, triads, seventh and ninth chords, diatonic and chromatic chord progressions, melodies and harmonies, including modern chord progressions in the major and minor modes, the ability to transcribe contemporary popular music and to dictate two and three-part contrapuntal material.

The Learning Assessment is recorded in:

MUH 224 Ear Training 4

The Artifact is:

The Final Examination (MUH 224)


HARMONY 2016-17

The Graduation Standard:
Demonstrate the ability to conduct instrumental and choral ensembles, including score reading and analysis, appreciation of principles of orchestration, arranging, voice development, and choral arranging and the ability to organize effective rehearsals with emphasis on the selection of suitable music and preparation for public performance.

The Learning Assessment is recorded in:

MUS 212 Harmony 4

The Artifact is:

The Final Examination (MUS 212)


KEYBOARDING 2016-17

The Graduation Standard:

Demonstrate keyboard skills through Level Four of the Five Towns College Keyboard Skills Core as set forth in the Five Towns College Undergraduate Catalog, including those keyboard proficiencies necessary for the performance of melodies and harmonic progressions in the small and large positions, the playing and reading of accompaniments, hymns and folk songs, modulation and improvisation, reduction of scores and conducting from the keyboard.

The Learning Assessment is recorded in:

MUS 232 Keyboard Lab 4

The Artifact is:

Course Work (MUS 232)


PERFORMANCE 2016-17

The Graduation Standard:

Demonstrate the ability to publicly perform on a professional level a varied repertoire, embracing major artistic trends through Level Four as set forth in the Five Towns College Performance Ensemble Core and published in the Five Towns College Undergraduate Catalog.

The Learning Assessment is recorded in:

MUS 442 Senior Recital

The Artifact is:

Jury Evaluation (MUS 442)


SIGHT SINGING 2016-17

The Graduation Standard:

Demonstrate advanced training in the sight singing of music through Level Four of the Five Towns College Sight Singing Core as set forth in the Five Towns College Undergraduate Catalog, including the singing of intervals, melodic phrases and more complex melodies using syncopated rhythms; training in aural and visual perception of complex rhythmical, contrapuntal and melodic material; sight reading in the base and treble clefs with an emphasis on chromaticism; development of a sense of tonality and the ability to sing major, minor and modal scales, major and minor triads, diatonic, minor, dominant and major seventh chords.

The Learning Assessment is recorded in:

MUS 222 Sight Singing 4

The Artifact is:

The Final Examination (MUS 222)


Proficiency: A specific skill, area of knowledge, ability, value or attitude designated by the faculty as a required competence for completion of a degree program or for General Education.

Examples: “Oral Communication,” “Accounting,” “Acting,” “Cinematography,” “Knowledge of the Learner”


Rubric: A classification system for evaluating a student’s performance on an Artifact; the classification consists of four ordered categories with designated numerical identities, a summary word to describe the category, and a standard written evaluation for the category. The standard Rubric used in the College’s SLAS to evaluate Artifacts is typically similar to the following Rubric employed for “Oral Communication:”

  • “Unmarked” or “0:” Student has either not taken the course with the relevant Artifact(s) or has been waived out of the intended course or is currently awaiting the evaluation of the submitted Artifact(s).
  •  “Unacceptable” or “1:” Student has not demonstrated the knowledge, skills, and dispositions required to communicate orally by preparing public presentations that are organized and substantive. Student displays of oral communication skills are characterized by hesitation, either verbally or non-verbally, or a lack of appreciation for ethnic or gender issues, or may reveal weak inter and intra-personal oral communication skills.
  • “Acceptable” or “2:” Student demonstrates the knowledge, skills, and dispositions required to communicate orally by preparing public presentations that are organized and substantive. Student displays these abilities most of the time without hesitation both verbally and non-verbally, and such displays demonstrate an understanding of ethnic and gender issues, while also revealing inter and intra-personal oral communication skills.
  • “Target” or “3:” Student demonstrates the knowledge, skills, and dispositions required to consistently communicate orally by preparing and delivering well-organized, content-rich, and articulate public presentations. Student displays these abilities without hesitation both verbally and non-verbally, and such displays demonstrate sensitivity for ethic and gender diversity, while revealing strong inter and intra-personal oral communication skills.

Back to Top

Graduation Requirements

For a matriculated student to be awarded a degree from Five Towns College, s/he must fulfill a number of basic requirements. These requirements have expanded in the past several years as a result of the College’s new “Student Learning Assessment System.”

What follows below are the College’s current graduation requirements:

1. Establishment of matriculation for a degree

2. Completion of the minimum number and distribution of credits required for the particular degree sought

3. A minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average (C.G.P.A.) of 2.0 for undergraduate students and 3.0 for graduate students

4. Settlement of all College financial and other obligations

5. Satisfaction of all General Education Proficiency requirements

6. Satisfaction of all Program Proficiency requirements

7. Filing of an Application for Graduation with the Registrar’s Office and paying the appropriate fee.

Further information on these requirements can be found in the Undergraduate College Catalog.

Every student must realize that the failure to satisfy even one of these requirements may result in either a delay in graduation or failure to graduate. The importance of understanding and fulfilling each requirement is, therefore, paramount.

Back to Top

The Framework

The Framework for Student Learning Assessment

The College’s SLAS is designed conceptually as a hierarchical structure. At the apex of the system is each degree program. Next, each program is categorized by a number of competency areas, termed “Proficiencies.” Each Proficiency designates an important aspect of learning for a particular degree. For the B.F.A. in Film/Video, as previously mentioned, the Proficiency might cover “Cinematography” or the ability to compose a scene on film so that the lighting, camera angles, choice of camera equipment, and special effects all contribute to the director’s intent of a scene. The B.P.S. in Business Management includes a Proficiency for “Marketing” or the ability to promote a product or service. Each of the Proficiencies required in a Degree Program or for General Education is deemed critical to acquire for any graduating student.

Next in the hierarchical structure is a Graduation Standard established for each Proficiency. The Graduation Standard indicates the types of specific behaviors or performance expected of a student in a required course in order to demonstrate that a student has been able to minimally meet the level of aptitude required for the Proficiency. Graduation Standards are behavioral, objective and measurable so that they do not leave much latitude for variability in an instructor’s judgment of whether a standard has been or has not been met. An example of a “Graduation Standard”  is that for the Proficiency “Oral Communication.” A student must, according to this standard, “Prepare and deliver a well-organized, content-rich and articulate public presentation of several minutes duration.”

In each required course for a Proficiency, a student must provide a specified document, final examination, presentation, research paper, project or other type of material. This material is evaluated by the appropriate division faculty and becomes evidence to determine if the student has met the Graduation Standard. The required material to document the attainment of a Graduation Standard is referred to as the Artifact. Artifacts are stored electronically in the College’s assessment software for later reporting to the student and analysis by advisors and the College.

Rubrics Uphold Student Evaluations

Rather than evaluating an Artifact with only traditional grades (e.g., “A,” “B”), faculty employ what is termed a Rubric. A Rubric is a scaled evaluation tool consisting of: (a) a standard written evaluation of the Artifact, (b) a term to summarize the overall evaluation, e.g. “Acceptable,” “Unacceptable,” and (c) a digit to coincide with the level of acceptability on the standard for the Artifact, e.g. “Unacceptable” is “0,” “Acceptable” is “1.” The standard Rubric for evaluating Artifacts at the College consists of four categories: “Unmarked” or “0,” “Unacceptable” or “1,” “Acceptable” or “2,” and “Target” or “3.”

Instrumental components of the SLAS are designated timeframes in a student’s matriculation when an assessment is made of that student’s progress towards the expected degree. These timeframes are termed Portals and generally occur at four periods: (a) Upon a student’s acceptance and enrollment at the College to ensure that the student has the requisite capabilities to complete the program successfully, (b) Upon completion of one year of full-time enrollment at the College or approximately 27 credit hours, (c) Upon completion of three years of full-time enrollment at the College or approximately 87 credit hours, and (d) Upon filing the Application for Graduation.

The PASS-PORT Data System

To capture data on student learning, the College utilizes the software program PASS-PORT. PASS-PORT has been specifically designed for student learning assessment and has proven quite successful at individual and program level analysis and reporting. Each newly enrolled student at the College pays a student learning assessment fee that entitles the student to have access to the software, whether or not enrolled at the College, for a specified number of years. The student may renew his or her license with PASS-PORT when notified by the software company, Innovative Learning Assessment Technologies (ILAT, www.ilat.org) that the existing license for use is expiring. Separate training and learning materials on PASS-PORT are provided to students during their years at the College.

Back to Top

The Process

The Process Established for Student Learning Assessment

Although each academic division at the College may deviate somewhat from the overall student learning assessment process described here, major variations do not usually occur. Therefore, all students admitted to the College enroll in a particular degree program, e.g. Mus.B. Jazz/Commercial Music. Some also enroll in a Concentration within their degree program, e.g., “Audio Recording Technology.”

Once enrolled, a PASS-PORT account is set up for the student and this account includes a General Education Portfolio Template, a Degree Program Portfolio Template and, if appropriate, a Concentration Portfolio Template. Each Portfolio Template is identified with the academic year for which the student was first enrolled, e.g., Mus.B. Jazz/Commercial Music 2009-10. Because modifications may be made from one academic year to another, the Portfolio Templates must be individually identified by the academic year for which they are intended. Portfolio Templates are not changed, except in exceptional circumstances, during the course of an academic year.

When a student completes a required Proficiency course, e.g. AUD 304 Nonlinear Recording, the Artifact for the course (in this case a quiz) may be submitted to PASS-PORT electronically by the student. The Artifact may also be submitted to PASS-PORT on behalf of the student by the instructor. An instructor who submits an Artifact may do so either electronically or providing a hard copy (on disk or by document) to the authorized SLAS staff in Room 108B.

Once the Artifact is uploaded to a student’s account, the Artifact will be evaluated using a Rubric either by having the student forward the Artifact within PASS-PORT to the instructor or by having the instructor evaluate the Artifact after its uploading to PASS-PORT. In either case, the student will be able to view, after an appropriate period of time, the evaluated Artifact for each required Proficiency course completed.

As previously indicated, at designated times (i.e., the designated Portal periods) during the course of a student’s enrollment at the College, the student’s PASS-PORT account will be reviewed by the appropriate division faculty to determine whether or not that student is making satisfactory progress in their degree program and in the General Education area.

If the student is making satisfactory progress, the standard procedures of meeting with a faculty advisor will continue, as will any existing academic meetings and activities.

If, however, the student fails to make satisfactory progress by obtaining an “Unacceptable” rating for a Proficiency, a number of consequences will result. The following section identifies the options available to students who fail to meet the minimum Graduation Standard for one or more Proficiencies.

Options for Students Not Satisfying Graduation Standards

For students who submit course Artifacts that are evaluated as “Unacceptable,” the College offers a number of options to rectify the situation.

The first option is available upon notification from an instructor that a student has submitted an “Unacceptable” Artifact. The student then has the option of trying to submit a new Artifact before the semester deadline date for submission of final course grades. If the student does not submit a revised Artifact prior to the submission of course grades, the student will receive a grade of “I,” an “Incomplete,” regardless of his or her performances on the additional course Grading Criteria. The grade of “I” will be removed the following semester when, and if, the student submits an “Acceptable” or “Target” Artifact within the first 10 weeks of the following semester. If a student resubmits an Artifact that does not satisfy the Graduation Standard or if the student fails to submit or resubmit an Artifact that meets the Graduation Standard within the first 10 weeks of the following semester, the final course grade of “I” will revert to an “F” and the student will need to retake the course.

Students unable to submit “Acceptable” or “Target” Artifacts within seven weeks of the following semester will have to retake the required course and their grade of “F” will remain on their transcripts.

Students who realize that they are having difficulties meeting Graduation Standards have a number of additional options at their disposal to remedy their situation. One option is to contact the College’s Academic Support Center, explain their situation, and seek tutoring assistance or other help. An additional option is for the student to contact his or her advisor, Division Chair, and/or the Director of Academic Advisement and ask for their assistance and/or advice. A further option is to obtain private tutoring, and a final option is to enroll in the same course during the summer or in an intersession when the number of credit hours and courses can be reduced so that the student may devote more time to the Artifact and the course requiring retaking.

Students who fail to meet two or more Proficiencies should seek immediate assistance from the Academic Support Center and notify the Director of Academic Advisement. The inability to fulfill a number of Proficiencies will almost certainly delay the expected date of graduate but, more seriously, may make matriculation in the intended degree program impossible. The College cannot be expected to take charge of a student’s academic performance and ensure her or his graduation. It is the student’s responsibility first, to realize when she or he is in serious academic difficulties, and second, to seek the assistance necessary to remain in good academic standing and complete all the required Proficiencies satisfactorily.

Back to Top

General Education Requirements

General Education Requirements

General Education requirements apply to all undergraduate students, no matter what their degree program. General Education proficiencies identified in this section are considered by Five Towns, and most other accredited colleges and universities, as skills, knowledge, abilities, values and attitudes essential for anyone awarded a college diploma and deemed “well educated.” These proficiencies concern the abilities to write well, speak well, think critically, appreciate culturally diversity, assess the quality of information, understand the scientific process of inquiry, demonstrate a working knowledge of computer hardware and software, and exhibit an appreciation of art and music.

#1: Critical Analysis & Reasoning

Graduation Standard: Explain, interpret, analyze and assess selected prose passages to demonstrate the ability to understand successfully the theme, organization, style, evidence and strength of the written arguments presented.

  • Required Course #1: ENG 101 English Composition 1
  • Required Artifact #1: The Final Essay
  • Required Course #2: ENG 102 English Composition 2
  • Required Artifact #2: The Research Paper

#2: Diversity

Graduation Standard: Demonstrate an understanding of the concept of “Diversity,” a basic knowledge of the history of America’s major cultural groups and an appreciation and respect for diverse perspectives and cultures.

  • Required Course #1: HIS 301 Cultural Diversity
  • Required Artifact #1: The Research Paper or Project

#3: Information Literacy

Graduation Standard: Identify needed information, access reliable and valid sources of that information, and understand, evaluate and utilize the accessed information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose, while simultaneously demonstrating an understanding of applicable information usage laws, regulations and institutional policies.

  • Required Course #1: SCI 103 Information Literacy
  • Required Artifact #1: The Final Project

#4: Oral Communication

Graduation Standard: Prepare and deliver a well-organized, content-rich and articulate public presentation of several minutes duration.

  • Required Course #1: SPE 101 Fundamentals of Speech
  • Required Artifact #1: Speech #2

OR

  • Required Course #1: SPE 231 Public Speaking
  • Required Artifact #1: Speech #6

#5: Scientific & Quantitative Reasoning

Graduation Standard: Adhere in a written test and project to a self-correcting system of inquiry, the Scientific Method, that relies upon empirical evidence and testable hypotheses to describe, understand, predict and control natural phenomena and employ mathematical methods, whether graphical, symbolic or numerical, to solve real-world problems.

  • Required Course #1: PSY 101 General Psychology
  • Required Artifact #1: Quiz #1

OR

  • Required Course #1: SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
  • Required Artifact #1: The Final Examination

AND

  • Required Course #2: MAT ___ (A Math Course)
  • Required Artifact #2: The Math Project

#6: Technological Competency

Graduation Standard: Demonstrate in a course and/or by experience a knowledge of hardware and software, file management, word processing, spreadsheets, Internet browsers, email systems and utilize new and emerging technologies.

  • Required Course #1: SCI 103 Information Literacy
  • Required Artifact #1: Successful Uploading and Submitting of an Artifact in electronic form to PASS-PORT

OR

  • Required Course #1: One Online Blackboard Course—listed on template as Successful completion of an online course
  • Required Artifact #1: Successful Completion of Course—listed on template as the final exam or project)

OR

  • Required Course #1: COM 101 Computers in Business
  • Required Artifact #1: Lab Portion of the Midsemester and

Final Examination

OR

  • Required Course #1: ELE 363 Computers and Technology
  • Required Artifact #1: MS Word Documents with Charts and

PowerPoint Presentations

OR

  • Required Course #1: SCI 141 Computer Literacy
  • Required Artifact #1: The Lab Project

#7: Values: Art Appreciation

Graduation Standard: Demonstrate in an examination a knowledge of the world’s major artists, masterpieces in art, and major periods in art history.

  • Required Course #1: ART ___ Art History 100/200 Level
  • Required Artifact #1 Slide Identifications on the Midsemester or Final Examination

#8: Values: Music History

Graduation Standard: Demonstrate on an examination a knowledge of the world’s major composers, music masterpieces, and major periods of music history, particularly in Jazz and Commercial Music.

  • Required Course #1: MUH ___ Music History 100/200 Level
  • Required Artifact #1: The Final Examination

#9: Written Composition

Graduation Standard: State clearly and literally in a portfolio of written works a minimum of spelling, grammar and syntax errors, clearly identified theses, and theses supported by evidence, logic and specific arguments. Proficiency must be demonstrated in writing in each of the following categories: Cause and Effect, Comparison and Contrast, Classification and Division, Definition and Argumentation.

  • Required Course #1: ENG 101 English Composition 1
  • Required Artifact #1: The Initial Essay
  • Required Course #2: ENG 102 English Composition 2
  • Required Artifact #2: The Research Paper
  • Required Course #3: ___ 300/400 Course in Major
  • Required Artifact #3: A  Paper or an Essay
  • Required Course #4: From any course of the student’s choosing
  • Required Artifact #4: A Paper or Essay 

Back to Top